Applying for a Resident Return visa? – Why it’s important to live in Australia for 2 years once you are a permanent resident

Resident return visa – common issues

I’ve received so many messages over the years from desperate people wanting to apply for a Resident Return Visa (subclass 155 and 157 ).   They share a common issue that they had not lived in Australia for a minimum of 2 years as permanent residents,  They had a range of reasons why they couldn’t live in Australia and had to return to their country of origin.

Most applicants for an RRV have initially hold their first permanent residence visa. When the validity of this visa is going to expire, they must renew this residency status.  An application for an RRV once approved by Immigration effectively renews the permanent residence status.

When you are a permanent resident, you can go on living in Australia as a permanent resident for many years using consecutive RRVs.  If you never choose to become an Australian citizen that is perfectly fine.

There was a variety of reasons why a person couldn’t live in Australia even though they have permanent residence. There may be health issues of parents to deal with, changing job commitments, or getting married for example. All valid reasons, that’s life.

However, when dealing with Immigration, the fact is if you don’t live in Australia for 2 years they want to you to know why and see proof that you have strong ties to Australia and had compelling reasons to live outside of Australia whilst holding permanent residency status.  They won’t just accept your word, these reasons and strong ties will need to proven with evidence.

Residency of 2 years or show strong ties

You must demonstrate that you have strong ties to the country show you are serious about living in Australia.  If you don’t have these strong ties but just your words that this time you are definitely going to live in Australia Immigration will not be interested in granting you a resident return visa.

Strong ties include having a job or evidence of an employment offer in Australia, a mortgage/property in Australia.  It can include having family members in Australia who are citizens or permanent residents, such as a spouse, children.  It must be close family ties.  If you have children in Australia, their lives are going to be significantly impacted if Immigration doesn’t give you a resident return visa.  Your second cousin by marriage who lives in Darwin, however, will probably get by if you don’t live in Australia anymore.

Perhaps Immigration has cause to be strict.  You applied for your initial migration visa. It was expensive, time-consuming and quite an application process to go through.  You succeeded, they granted you the visa with the full expectation that in the 5 years of your migration visa, you would be living in Australia.  Now you are to applying for a resident return visa without meeting the minimum residency requirement.  Furthermore, you have no real ties to Australia except a promise that this time you will live in Australia in the future.

Now I might sound harsh particularly for those people who are in this situation described above.  My article here is really for new migrants or people in the process of applying for their first migration visa.  It’s actually important to live in Australia after you get your first migration visa.  You must be familiar with what the resident return visa application involves.  Prepare early for applying for a resident return visa, When the time comes you will give yourself the best chance of success.

Requirements and Application process

Applications for a Resident Return Visa are lodged online through the Department of Home Affairs, ImmiAccount system. If you meet the residency requirement, the visa processing time could be a matter of days.   If you have to prove your strong ties to Australia the processing time may be several weeks to months.

Get in touch if you want to learn how to successfully apply for an Australia visa.

 

4 Replies to “Applying for a Resident Return visa? – Why it’s important to live in Australia for 2 years once you are a permanent resident”

  1. Hello Mege,
    Can you help? My husband’s RRV expires on 01.05.18. I am currently waiting to hear if my RRV will be granted. If successful we aim to depart UK before 01.05.18. However we have an 8 month old son. He is not a returning resident as was born in UK. We do not have time to apply for a permanent visa for him. Can you advise me how we get him there?
    Thank you, R

  2. Hi I am singer sumon mukherjee Bangladesh tv act professional classical singer teacher.I need singer teachings Bengali song or classical advice job visa important Australia houge or school interested,my dreams,please opportunity fore me.requst my employees person help me .

  3. Hi, I have a 7 year old Australian born son who lives with his mother in Brisbane. I am from Turkey and I and my son’s mother had gone into a relationship when she was on holiday in Turkey and she returned back to Australia after she got pregnant. This was also our relationship was over. I went to Australia for family Court and shared parental responsibility is granted by the court. Now, I seek an option to relocate to Australia as I can be close to my son to be a good father and support him both financially and psychologically. Is there a chance for me to gain any sort of visa to live and work in Australia? Thanks.

  4. Hi,
    I am 44 years of age, my son is studying in a most prestigious institute of Melbourne, how can I live with my son for a longer tenure to look after him, and is it possible if I can work long my stay if I get a visa for a longer period ?
    I’m a diploma holder in Fashion Designing and I have done A course of Nursery Teachers Training (NTT), at present I’m working for (People For Animals) a NGO in India where we look after the street animals.
    Looking forward for you help and advise.
    Regards
    Vinnie Ghuman

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